Category Archives: DMR

DMR: Pi-Star Update Error Fix

If you get error issues with git failing to update your pistar system files, it will always be that the checksum of a file/s has changed in either /usr/local/bin or /usr/local/sbin or /var/www/dashboard

It is caused by the file system having been put back into read/write (rpi-rw) and your pi suffers a hiccup while a file is being accessed or if you happen to edit files in those directories.

Here is how to resolve this problem..

Log into SSH and do one of the sets of commands that is for the area having the error.

rpi-rw
cd /usr/local/bin
sudo git stash
sudo git pull
rpi-ro

rpi-rw
cd /usr/local/sbin
sudo git stash
sudo git pull
rpi-ro

rpi-rw
cd /var/www/dashboard
sudo git stash
sudo git pull
rpi-ro

After it completes do a sudo pistar-update to make sure it is fixed.

By Al AF4FA

DMR: How to set up multi network hotspots

Revised 25 May, 2020
Often when people create a DMR hotspot they set them up for only one network. But if they want to use DMR+ one moment, then Brandmeister the next and then later talk with someone on the TGIF network they will need to switch back and forth depending on which network they want to use.

Switching back and forth between networks works well. But this involves loading the configuration for the network that you want to use. But what if you want to be able to use multiple networks at the same time? This can easily be done by configuring the following within your Pi-Star settings. You will also need to update the code plug within your radio. But once you have everything setup you will be able to go from Brandmeister to DMR+ to TGIF all within the radio. No need to change the configuration within your hotspot.

Hotspot Setup
To get started, first you will want to backup your configuration. This way if something goes wrong you will be able to get back to where you started. Next, in pi-star click on configuration, then Expert, then in the Full Edit row click on DMR GW. You will want to configure the various DMR Networks.

Cut and paste the following into the section showing your DMR networks in the expert configuration file. Be sure to modify the proper sections with your DMR ID etc otherwise the network will not let you connect. Your DMR network sections should look exactly like my examples below except for the following:

DMR Network 1 – you will need to enter your Brandmeister Hotspot Security Password between the quotes and your DMR ID where it is called for. You may also want to change your Brandmeister master server to the one closest to your physical location however it probably won’t really make much of a difference in performance. The Canadian server works quite well and has very low latency from just about anywhere. It also has fewer users than other servers so you may actually find it works a little better.

In DMR Network 2 you need to enter your DMR ID where it is called for. I suggest keeping the IPSC2 server as IPSC2-QuadNet. Full disclosure, I am an admin and founding member with QuadNet so I am probably a little biased. IPSC2-QuadNet is the server that we run and one that we can make sure works and works well. If there is a problem, we fix it. If our users have an issue we can try to help We can’t say the same about other servers. That being said you can use any IPSC2 server that you prefer. If you select a different server you may find that talkgroups may not work as expected but you can contact the server owner for assistance.

The options= line in this section is configured with the most active DMR+ talkgroups and is how I
have my configuration setup. But you can change these as desired.

DMR Network 3 can be left as is
DMR Network 4 – Enter your DMR ID where it is called for
[DMR Network 1]
Enabled=1
Address=158.69.203.89
Port=62031
TGRewrite0=2,9,2,9,1
TypeRewrite1=1,9990,1,9990
TypeRewrite2=2,9990,2,9990
SrcRewrite0=2,4000,2,9,1001
PassAllPC1=1
PassAllPC2=2
PassAllTG1=1
PassAllTG2=2
Password=”Enter your BM Hotspot Security Password here”
Debug=0
Name=BM_Canada_3021
Id=Enter your DMR ID here
[DMR Network 2]
Enabled=1
Address=168.235.109.210
Port=55555
TGRewrite0=2,8,2,9,1
TGRewrite1=2,80505,2,505,1
TGRewrite2=2,80800,2,800,100
TGRewrite3=2,83801,2,3801,8
TGRewrite4=2,89990,2,9990,1
TGRewrite5=2,80001,1,1,9999
TGRewrite6=2,80001,2,1,9999
PCRewrite0=2,84000,2,4000,1001
Password=”PASSWORD”
Debug=0
Id=Enter your DMR ID here
Name=DMR+_IPSC2-QUADNET
Options=”TS1_1=1;TS1_2=2;TS1_3=3;TS1_4=13;TS1_5=133;TS1_6=235;TS1_7=315;TS1_8=320″
[DMR Network 3]
Enabled=0
Name=HBLink
Address=1.2.3.4
Port=5555
TGRewrite0=2,11,2,11,1
Password=PASSWORD
Location=0
Debug=0
[DMR Network 4]
Enabled=1
Name=TGIF_Network
PCRewrite1=1,4009990,1,9990,1
PCRewrite2=2,4009990,2,9990,1
TypeRewrite1=1,4009990,1,9990
TypeRewrite2=2,4009990,2,9990
TGRewrite1=1,4000001,1,1,999999
TGRewrite2=2,4000001,2,1,999999
SrcRewrite1=1,9990,1,4009990,1
SrcRewrite2=2,9990,2,4009990,1
SrcRewrite3=1,1,1,4000001,999999
SrcRewrite4=2,1,2,4000001,999999
Address=tgif.network
Password=passw0rd
Port=62031
Location=0
Debug=0
Id=Enter your DMR ID here

Once your DMR Networks are configured as shown in the examples, scroll to the bottom of the page and click on Apply Changes. Next click on Admin, then power, finally click on reboot to restart your hotspot.

Radio Setup
The next thing you will need to do is to configure your radio to work with the new hotspot settings. Each talkgroup you add to your code plug will need to have the proper prefix added except for Brandmeister. BM talkgroups can be used as you always have without a prefix. This should make updating your code plug fairly painless. The other networks you will need to add the prefix as follows:

DMR+ Setup
The DMR+ prefix is 8 and each talkgroup has 4 digits. So to use access the QuadNet Array you would use talkgroup 80320. To program the talkgroup for North America you would use 80003 and so on. The following are the most active DMR+ talkgroups so I converted them to the proper format for you:

80001 – World Wide (All languages)
80002 – Europe
80003 – North America
80013 – World Wide English
80113 – UAE 1 (User Accessible English 1)
80123 – UAE 2 (User Accessible English 2)
80133 – USA Wide
80235 – United Kingdom
80302 – Canada Wide
80315 – QuadNet Technical (Linked to D-STAR)
80320 – QuadNet Array (linked to D-STAR, Brandmeister DMR, Yaesu System Fusion & Wires X
80505 – Australia Wide
89990 – DMR+ Parrot. This needs to be setup as a group call.

Brandmeister Setup
Brandmeister has no prefix. Just program the talkgroup number as you always have
TGIF Setup TGIF is 4 and the talkgroup numbers are 6 digits. So to use the IRN talkgroup on TGIF talkgroup 320 would be programmed as 4000320

Testing your hotspot
Now let’s test your setup to confirm everything is working using each network’s Parrot. To test the Brandmeister connection, do a private call to 9990. To test DMR+ send a group call to 89990 and to test TGIF send a private call to 4009990. Each should play back what you transmit. If one of the networks does not work check the configuration file to be sure you entered all of the required information such as your DMR ID or your Brandmeister hotspot security password, save and try again.

Private Calls
To make a private call to another station, just enter their DMR ID in your code plug and select private call. The call will be routed over the Brandmeister network. I hope this helps you to get your multi network hotspot up and running. If you have any questions, feel free to give me a call on the QuadNet Array DMR+ talkgroup 320. You can also send an email to jeff@edmontonfireradio.com. If you have any questions about the IPSC2-QuadNet server, send an email to admins@openquad.net I would like to thank Cliff VE6PLC and Andy MW0MWZ for your help with this configuration.

Without your input this solution would not have been nearly as elegant. I would also like to thank the many volunteers that helped make sure this worked on their hotspot. If it weren’t for you helping to find bugs this project would have been a lot more difficult.

73 –

Andy MW0MWZ
Jeff VE6DV

DMR: Obtaining faster GPS lock

It is commonly observed that the GPS is slow to lock.

The GPS module as used in 868/878 is a dual GPS & BDS (BeiDou – Chinese equivalent to GPS with worldwide coverage) sensor, and it is configured to check not only L1 frequency for GPS, but also E1, E2, E5a, E5b and E6 frequencies for BDS.

That is a lot more work for the module to do and explains why it is a bit slow to get an initial position lock.

878 firmware versions permit the user to choose GPS only, BDS only or both systems used together.

For the 868 this mod has to be done in order to to speed up obtaining a position fix by selecting just GPS or BDS, but not both together.

For those who want to upgrade to later firmware versions, you can still make this selection with a bit of work each time you upgrade the firmware.

The GPS module uses standard NMEA text strings, and the configuration for the GPS module is sent by the MCU from plain text instructions stored in the firmware.

If you use a hex editor to search for the NMEA command text $PCAS04,3 and change that text to $PCAS04,2 for BDS only or $PCAS04,1 for GPS only, you will speed up the time to get a position lock quite a bit, from typically 134 seconds to less than 30 seconds when outside.

You only have to change the 3 to a 2 or a 1 depending on which one you want to use.

After you make the change make sure you save the file.

This also translates to slightly improved lock times when GPS signals are weak such as inside a house or inside a vehicle.

 

Good Luck

AL AF4FA

DMR: Configure a Pi-Star based multi network DMR hotspot

Revised 25 May, 2020
Often when people create a DMR hotspot they set them up for only one network. But if they want to use DMR+ one moment, then Brandmeister the next and then later talk with someone on the TGIF network they will need to switch back and forth depending on which network they want to use.

Switching back and forth between networks works well. But this involves loading the configuration for the network that you want to use. But what if you want to be able to use  multiple networks at the same time? This can easily be done by configuring the following within your Pi-Star settings. You will also need to update the code plug within your radio. But once you have everything setup you will be able to go from Brandmeister to DMR+ to TGIF all within the radio. No need to change the configuration within your hotspot.

Hotspot Setup
To get started, first you will want to backup your configuration. This way if something goes wrong you will be able to get back to where you started. Next, in pi-star click on configuration, then Expert, then in the Full Edit row click on DMR GW. You will want to configure the various DMR Networks. Cut and paste the following into the section showing your DMR networks in the expert configuration file. Be sure to modify the proper sections with your DMR ID etc otherwise the network will not let you connect. Your DMR network sections should look exactly like my examples below except for the following:

DMR Network 1 – you will need to enter your Brandmeister Hotspot Security Password between the quotes and your DMR ID where it is called for. You may also want to change your Brandmeister master server to the one closest to your physical location however it probably won’t really make much of a difference in performance. The Canadian server works quite well and has very low latency from just about anywhere. It also has fewer users than other servers so you may actually find it works a little better.

In DMR Network 2 you need to enter your DMR ID where it is called for. I suggest keeping the IPSC2 server as IPSC2-QuadNet. Full disclosure, I am an admin and founding member with QuadNet so I am probably a little biased. IPSC2-QuadNet is the server that we run and one that we can make sure works and works well. If there is a problem, we fix it. If our users have an issue we can try to help We can’t say the same about other servers. That being said you can use any IPSC2 server that you prefer. If you select a different server you may find that talkgroups may not work as expected but you can contact the server owner for assistance.

The options= line in this section is configured with the most active DMR+ talkgroups and is how I
have my configuration setup. But you can change these as desired.

DMR Network 3 can be left as is
DMR Network 4 – Enter your DMR ID where it is called for
[DMR Network 1]
Enabled=1
Address=158.69.203.89
Port=62031
TGRewrite0=2,9,2,9,1
TypeRewrite1=1,9990,1,9990
TypeRewrite2=2,9990,2,9990
SrcRewrite0=2,4000,2,9,1001
PassAllPC1=1
PassAllPC2=2
PassAllTG1=1
PassAllTG2=2
Password=”Enter your BM Hotspot Security Password here”
Debug=0
Name=BM_Canada_3021
Id=Enter your DMR ID here
[DMR Network 2]
Enabled=1
Address=168.235.109.210
Port=55555
TGRewrite0=2,8,2,9,1
TGRewrite1=2,80505,2,505,1
TGRewrite2=2,80800,2,800,100
TGRewrite3=2,83801,2,3801,8
TGRewrite4=2,89990,2,9990,1
TGRewrite5=2,80001,1,1,9999
TGRewrite6=2,80001,2,1,9999
PCRewrite0=2,84000,2,4000,1001
Password=”PASSWORD”
Debug=0
Id=Enter your DMR ID here
Name=DMR+_IPSC2-QUADNET
Options=”TS1_1=1;TS1_2=2;TS1_3=3;TS1_4=13;TS1_5=133;TS1_6=235;TS1_7=315;TS1_8=320″
[DMR Network 3]
Enabled=0
Name=HBLink
Address=1.2.3.4
Port=5555
TGRewrite0=2,11,2,11,1
Password=PASSWORD
Location=0
Debug=0
[DMR Network 4]
Enabled=1
Name=TGIF_Network
PCRewrite1=1,4009990,1,9990,1
PCRewrite2=2,4009990,2,9990,1
TypeRewrite1=1,4009990,1,9990
TypeRewrite2=2,4009990,2,9990
TGRewrite1=1,4000001,1,1,999999
TGRewrite2=2,4000001,2,1,999999
SrcRewrite1=1,9990,1,4009990,1
SrcRewrite2=2,9990,2,4009990,1
SrcRewrite3=1,1,1,4000001,999999
SrcRewrite4=2,1,2,4000001,999999
Address=tgif.network
Password=passw0rd
Port=62031
Location=0
Debug=0
Id=Enter your DMR ID here

Once your DMR Networks are configured as shown in the examples, scroll to the bottom of the page and click on Apply Changes. Next click on Admin, then power, finally click on reboot to restart your hotspot.

Radio Setup
The next thing you will need to do is to configure your radio to work with the new hotspot settings. Each talkgroup you add to your code plug will need to have the proper prefix added except for Brandmeister. BM talkgroups can be used as you always have without a prefix. This should make updating your code plug fairly painless. The other networks you will need to add the prefix as follows:

DMR+ Setup
The DMR+ prefix is 8 and each talkgroup has 4 digits. So to use access the QuadNet Array you would use talkgroup 80320. To program the talkgroup for North America you would use 80003 and so on. The following are the most active DMR+ talkgroups so I converted them to the proper format for you:

80001 – World Wide (All languages)
80002 – Europe
80003 – North America
80013 – World Wide English
80113 – UAE 1 (User Accessible English 1)
80123 – UAE 2 (User Accessible English 2)
80133 – USA Wide
80235 – United Kingdom
80302 – Canada Wide
80315 – QuadNet Technical (Linked to D-STAR)
80320 – QuadNet Array (linked to D-STAR, Brandmeister DMR, Yaesu System Fusion & Wires X
80505 – Australia Wide
89990 – DMR+ Parrot. This needs to be setup as a group call.

Brandmeister Setup
Brandmeister has no prefix. Just program the talkgroup number as you always have

TGIF Setup
TGIF is 4 and the talkgroup numbers are 6 digits. So to use the IRN talkgroup on TGIF talkgroup 320 would be programmed as 4000320

Testing your hotspot
Now let’s test your setup to confirm everything is working using each network’s Parrot. To test the Brandmeister connection, do a private call to 9990. To test DMR+ send a group call to 89990 and to test TGIF send a private call to 4009990. Each should play back what you transmit. If one of the networks does not work check the configuration file to be sure you entered all of the required information such as your DMR ID or your Brandmeister hotspot security password, save and try again.

Private Calls
To make a private call to another station, just enter their DMR ID in your code plug and select private call. The call will be routed over the Brandmeister network.
I hope this helps you to get your multi network hotspot up and running. If you have any questions, feel free to give me a call on the QuadNet Array DMR+ talkgroup 320. You can also send an email to jeff@edmontonfireradio.com. If you have any questions about the IPSC2-QuadNet server, send an email to admins@openquad.net

I would like to thank Cliff VE6PLC and Andy MW0MWZ for your help with this configuration.
Without your input this solution would not have been nearly as elegant. I would also like to thank the many volunteers that helped make sure this worked on their hotspot. If it weren’t for you helping to find bugs this project would have been a lot more difficult.

73 – Jeff VE6DV

DMR: Remove Password MD380/90

Go to the folder the CPS is in (C:\TYT-CPSxxx) or where you saved it to
2. look for file – setting.ini
3. Right click and edit
4. password=0 change to password=password
5. Save the file

Connect radio to PC and turn on in normal mode.
a. Read the Code plug from the radio.
b. Click on General Settings and remove all password entries
c. Save Code plug
d. Write the Code Plug back to the radio

Now all should be good

Al AF4FA

DMR: BrandMeister Messaging

One very cool but often underutilized feature of DMR is the ability to send and receive SMS messages.The BrandMeister network has a few different SMS service numbers and functions available. The details on this service can be found on this page in the BrandMeister wiki (which you will have to translate from German). In this post I’ll summarize those functions and discuss how to use them.

Initial Setup

Before using BrandMeister SMS, you need to have messaging configured properly in your radio and in BrandMeister selfcare. This varies by radio, but for the AnyTone radios you will need to set messaging to M-SMS in the CPS under “Optional Settings>Digital Func” (see image), and in BrandMeister SelfCare select Motorola under “Brand” (see image).

AnyTone CPS settings
BrandMeister SelfCare settings

Once you have these settings in place, you can start messaging. I’ve tested this extensively with my hotspots and the AnyTone 878. It works reliably with my simplex hotspots, but is *not* reliable with my duplex N5BOC hotspot and the 878. I believe this is because the radio and hotspot cannot maintain the back and forth handshake needed to complete the message transmission, especially when passing from the hotspot to the radio. This issue with the AnyTone radios and duplex hotspots is well known and documented, and manifests itself as missed key-ups during normal voice operation. I have not tested in with a BrandMeister repeater and the 878 yet, so your mileage may vary.

Available SMS Functions

Here are the SMS service numbers (private calls) and associated functions available through BrandMeister:

  • 262993 – GPS and weather
  • 262994 – Repeater query / POCSAG / dapnet
  • 262995 – SMSC

Based on the function you desire, you will be sending the SMS to one of the three private call numbers above. I’ll walk through message format and features for each. Note that case is not important, so you can send in UPPER or lower case.

Because of message length limitations on the AnyTone radios, you first need to set a custom configuration for message length in order to properly receive some messages with the AnyTones. To do this, you first need to activate your special configurations option by sending this to 262993:

CONFIG ON

Then send this to limit the message length:

CONFIG SHORT

You can check that the setting was received by sending:

CONFIG

The returned message should confirm that your special config is Active and SMS: SHORT. Now you should be ready to go. For more details on the special configuration settings, see this part of the wiki.

262993: Weather and GPS

For all of these functions, you will be sending SMS to 262993 as a private call. To receive and SMS with a list of the various functions available on this service, send:

help

To receive the weather locations at the repeater or hotspot site (provided that the location is set), send:

wx

You can also use the following message formats to receive weather conditions when the repeater or hotspot location is not set:

wx Town
wx zip town
wx zip, cc
wx Town, cc
wx zip town, cc

For example, I could send:

WX MELBOURNE, AU

…and I would receive this message in return:

You can also request a METAR weather report for any airport using the four letter ICAO Airport code for that airport. For example, to request the METAR for Broomfield/Jeffco airport in Colorado, I would send:

METAR KJBC

which returns the METAR as long as it is no more than 2 hours old.

You can also request weather for a specific location based on GPS. To do so send:

WX GPS

And if you have sent a GPS location recently to the system (ie through DPRS) it should return weather for that location.

You can see the GPS location that you have sent to the system by sending:

GPS

which will return your last reported position. If you want to manually update the APRS system (and Brandmeister) without sending a GPS formatted message to the BM APRS call (xxx999 where xxx are the first three digits of the master server), then you can send:

APRS LAT LON

Where LAT and LON are you coordinates in decimal format.

262994: Repeater query / POCSAG / dapnet

To use these functions, you will be sending messages to 262994. You can query a repeater and get a message listing its static and dynamic talkgroups by sending:

rpt

And although I have not tested it, apparently you can send an SMS to a POCSAG pager on dapnet by sending the following (without brackets) to 2262994:

<callsign> <message>

If anyone uses dapnet, try this and let us know how it works.

262995: SMSC

One of the most useful function in my opinion is the ability to send SMS messages to another station without using their CCS7 ID. Of course you can just send an SMS to another user’s CCS7 ID and if they are on the same system at the time they will receive the message. But the Brandmeister system allows sending to callsigns, and provides store and forward functionality, which is a great feature. So the receiving station does not need to be online at the time the message is sent. They can query their message inbox when they come back online and retrieve the message then. Like an old packet BBS, but with DMR!

To send an SMS to another station, send the following to 262995:

<callsign> <message>

So for example I could send Jon a message:

KE8JLU Hey Jon what TG are you on?

And the message would be sent to Jon. The system will send you a message to confirm receipt:

Message receipt from BM 262995

On the receiving end, automatic delivery is possible. The wiki specifies that: “For notification and for automatic delivery, the radio must have activated ARS (Motorola) or RRS (Hytera) or send the GPS position regularly.” That means you will receive automated delivery as long as you update you GPS position by sending APRS formatted messages to xxx999 (e.g., 310999 in the USA). You still need to activate automatic message delivery by sending this to 262995:

DIRECT ON

You will then receive a message from 262995 stating:

Direct SMS ON, you will receive SMS after ARS/RRS/GPS was active on xxx999 or 5057

(Note that 5057 no longer exists, so do not send a message to that ID). To manually check messages, send:

INBOX

You will receive a message with a lit of messages in your inbox. To retrieve and read one (say message number 3 in the list), reply with:

GET 3

and you will receive message number 3. To delete message number 3, send:

DELETE 3

and you will receive confirmation that the message has been deleted. Be cautious – if you just send:

DELETE

all messages in your inbox will be deleted!

I think some best practices for using the BrandMeister SMS functions would be to make sure your intended recipient knows to check their INBOX, or has set up automatic delivery. And saving some “Quick Text” messages in your codeplug would be a great idea, for example, “On my way”, “What TG are you on?”

Note that you can also combine SMS with the BrandMeister APRS service. By sending a properly formatted SMS to xxx999 (where xxx is the first three digits of the BM master that you are on) you can send the SMS to a mobile/cellular phone number using the APRS SMSGTE service. To do this, send the following to xxx999:

SMSGTE @<phone number> <message text>

For example, I sent this to my mobile number through BM master 5051 (I’m in Australia now using my VK3BUD callsign):

SMS sent to my mobile phone using the BM service and SMSGTE

I received this on my phone and replied as shown in the screenshot:

SMS received on my mobile, and reply sent

Then received that message back on the AnyTone as shown:

SMS from my mobile received on the AnyTone

Note that the reply on the radio came from “@ME”. This is because I’ve set up my mobile number as an alias in the SMSGTE system. See the SMSGTE website for details on how to do that. Pretty cool!

Closing Thoughts

BrandMeister has some very cool and useful SMS functions built into the system. The ability to retrieve current weather may not be so useful when we have smartphones, but I could envision using it with a remote BM repeater (like the N0WAR machine in Estes Park) while hiking in the backcountry. The ability to send store and forward SMS is a great feature. I can think of a number of use cases where this would come in handy when communicating with others on the BrandMeister network. And when coupled with external services like SMSGTE on the APRS network, one can communicate with mobile phone users. We hams should practice using these features more. It’s a lot of fun!

DMR: Updating the Pi-Star system

Updating the Pi-Star system to the new system by creating a new SD card

CLICK HERE FOR PLAYING WITH PI-STAR

First thing to do is to save your current configuration by logging into your pi-star and going to configuration and the backup/restore and click on download configuration. This will create a zip file needed later.

Bring up your web browser and go to www.pistar.uk

On the left side near the bottom hover over downloads

then click on Download Pi-star

then click on bottom one (Pi-Star_RP1_V4.1.0-26-Mar-2020.zip)

download it (save the file)

If you need the SD CARD FORMATTER program

Bring up your web browser and enter in the search box sd card formatter

pick the first entry and download the zip file

unzip it and install the program

If you need the IMAGE INSTALLER program

Bring up your web browser and enter in the search box balenaetcher

pick the first entry and download the exe file

Install the program

If you would rather use a different IMAGE INSTALLER

Bring up your web browser and enter in the search box w32diskimager

pick the first entry and download the exe file

Install the program

After you have done all the above

Insert your sd card into a holder and insert it into the computer

Make sure you write down the drive letter assigned to it.

Click on the sd card formatter and enter the drive letter associated to the SD card and format it. this takes a long time, approx 20 min or more.

Unzip the pi-star file and save it to the desktop

now click on the IMAGER program you chose and again make sure the drive letter is correct. Select the .img file you unzipped and write it to the SD card. This takes about 5 to 10 min.

After the write is complete copy your saved configuration zip file from your old pistar to the base directory of the sd card.

You are now ready to insert the SD card into your Pi-Star hotspot and turn it on to automatically expand the system files and reapply your configuration.

This will take a couple of minutes to do and then you can log into the Pi-Star and do an update to get current by going to configuration then expert then SSH access.

Enter pi-star then the password(raspberry).

Then enter sudo pistar-update and after that completes enter sudo-pistar-upgrade.

In some cases if jumping multiple versions, you will have to upgrade several times aka the number of versions to become current.

After this is done type exit to leave the SSH.

If you had changed the password you can now reset it by going to configuration and entering your own password.

In some cases the display will reappear once you try transmitting to the pistar.

Good luck and 73

Al AF4FA

 

DMR: Updating the Pi-Star system to the new system

Updating the Pi-Star system to the new system by creating a new SD card

First thing to do is to save your current configuration by logging into your pi-star and going to configuration and the backup/restore and click on download configuration. This will create a zip file needed later.

  • Bring up your web browser and go to www.pistar.uk
  • On the left side near the bottom hover over downloads
  • then click on Beta Releases
  • then click on bottom one (Pi-Star_RP1_V4.1.0-RC7_20-Dec-2019.zip) and
  • download it (save the file)

If you need the SD CARD FORMATTER program

  • Bring up your web browser and enter in the search box sd card formatter
  • pick the first entry and download the zip file
  • unzip it and install the program

If you need the IMAGE INSTALLER program

  • Bring up your web browser and enter in the search box balenaetcher
  • pick the first entry and download the exe file
  • Install the program

If you would rather use a different IMAGE INSTALLER

  • Bring up your web browser and enter in the search box w32diskimager
  • pick the first entry and download the exe file
  • Install the program

After you have done all the above

  • Insert your sd card into a holder and insert it into the computer
  • Make sure you write down the drive letter assigned to it.
  • Click on the sd card formatter, enter the drive letter associated to the SD card, format it.
  • Unzip the pi-star file and save it to the desktop
  • now click on the IMAGER program you chose and again make sure the drive letter is correct. Select the .img file you unzipped and write it to the SD card.
  • After the write is complete copy your saved configuration zip file from your old pistar to the base directory of the sd card.

You are now ready to insert the SD card into your Pi-Star hotspot and turn it on to automatically expand the system files and reapply your configuration. This will take a couple of minutes to do and then you can log into the Pi-Star and do an update to get current by going to configuration then expert then SSH access.

Enter pi-star then the password(raspberry). Then enter sudo pistar-update. After this is done type exit to leave the SSH. If you had changed the password you can now reset it by going to configuration and entering your own password.

Provided by Al AF4FA

 

 

DMR: Pi-Star Users – Change your default password ASAP

Attention Pi-Star (digital hotspot Raspberry PI operating System) Users:

PLEASE change your default passwords before exposing your pi-star to the internet. As in, GO DO IT NOW.

It takes less than 2 minutes for a hacker to query for open-to-the-internet pi-stars (CLICK HERE FMI), randomly pick one, use the default creds, and get a remote SSH shell into your home network. You’re basically locking your front door but leaving a window open. Once inside your home network, the hacker can sniff your traffic, spoof your identity, and do a whole host of other stuff. Getting into a network is the hard part, and you’re leaving it wide open.

Oh also, since your callsign is on it, a hacker can not only do stuff from your home internet, but knows where your home is and can impersonate you by name!

This only affects you directly if you have the “Dashboard Access” or “SSH access” set to public, but you should change the password either way.

CLICK HERE FOR HOW-TO BRANDMEISTER SECURITY

73

Al AF4FA

DMR: NY Metro and TG-311037

The following is a kind offering by Bernie NY4Z to adjust the following DMR repeaters in the NY Metro area. Our thanks to Bernie for this helping hand.


Now that you have gotten your new site and TG internet connectivity I have made changes to accommodate your new talk group 310037. I have set you up as a PTT with a 15 minute timer (TS1) on the machines below which should give you 100 plus miles of coverage in most directions around NYC with a mobile radio and many of these areas have good HT coverage.

GW Bridge, NY N2NSA 443.8875 + 5.00 Color Code 1
Time Slot
#1 – Group Call TG 444 NY Metro System Wide – FT
#1 – Group Call TG 333 = DMR Plus Reflector 4604 (NY Reflector) PTT
#1 – Group Call TG 310037 BRARA (Boca Raton ARA) Local Talk Group -PTT
#1 Group Call TG-9998= Parrot audio test (PTT)
#2 – Members Only private Talk Group

White Plains, NY NY4Z 442.10625 +5 MHz Color Code 3
Time Slot
#1 – Group Call TG 444 NY Metro System Wide – FT
#1 – Group Call TG 333 = DMR Plus Reflector 4604 (NY Reflector) PTT
#1 – Group Call TG 310037 BRARA(Boca Raton ARA) Local Talk Group -PTT
#1 – Group Call TG 347639 Disney – PTT
#1- Group Call TG 31660- Ocean county NJ (PTT)
#1 Group Call TG-9998= Parrot audio test (PTT)
#2 – Members Only private Talk Group

Glen Oaks , NY WB2WAK 438.51250 -5 MHz Color Code 1
Time Slot
#1 – Group Call TG 444 NY Metro System Wide – FT
#1 – Group Call TG 1 = World Wide -PTT
#1 – Group Call TG 3 = North America – PTT
#1 – Group Call TG 347639 Disney – PTT
#1 – Group Call TG 13 = World Wide English – PTT
#1 – Group Call TG 3172 = NE / Regional – PTT
#1 – Group Call TG 310 = Tac 310 – PTT
#1 – Group Call TG 311 = Tac 311 – PTT
#1 – Group Call TG 333 = DMR Plus Reflector 4604 (NY Reflector) PTT
#1 – Group Call TG 3110037= BRARA (Boca Raton ARA) Local Talk Group -PTT
#1 – Group Call TG 31660 = Ocean county NJ- PTT
#1 – Group Call TG 9998 = Parrot , Audio Test Server – PTT
#2 – Members Only private Talk Group

Mt. Beacon, NY NY4Z 441.450 + 5. MHZ CC7
Time Slot
#1 – Group Call TG 347639 Disney – FT
#1 – Group Call TG 9998 = Parrot, Audio Test Server – PTT
#1 – Group Call TG 9 Local Talk Group – FT
#1 – Group Call TG 31361 = Upstate NY – PTT
#1 – Group Call TG 333 = DMR Plus Reflector 4604 (NY Reflector) PTT
#1 – Group Call TG 310037 BRARA (Boca Raton ARA) Local Talk Group -PTT
#2 – Group Call TG 444 NY Metro System Wide – FT

Manahawkin , NJ K2HR 445.4250 – 5 MHz Color Code 3
Time Slot
#1 – Group Call TG 444 NY Metro System Wide – FT
#1 – Group Call TG 347639 Disney – PTT
#1 – Group Call TG 1 = World Wide – PTT
#1 – Group Call TG 3 = North America – PTT
#1 – Group Call TG 13 = World Wide English – PTT
#1 – Group Call TG 3172 = NE / Regional – PTT
#1 – Group Call TG 123 = UA English 2 Talk Group – PTT
#1 – Group Call TG 310 = Tac 310 – PTT
#1 – Group Call TG 311 = Tac 311 – PTT
#1 – Group Call TG 333 = DMR Plus Reflector 4604 (NY Reflector) PTT
#1 – Group Call TG 3134 = New Jersey StateWide – PTT
#1 – Group Call TG 9998 = Parrot , Audio Test Server – PTT
#1- Group Call TG 31660- Ocean county NJ (PTT)
#1 – Group Call TG 310037 BRARA (Boca Raton ARA) Local Talk Group -PTT
#1 – Group Call TG 9 Local Talk Group – FT
#2 – member only private Talk Group

You are welcome to share this information if you desire.

Regards,
Bernie NY4Z